Government Warnings

Department of State Travel Warnings and Alerts

Department of State

  • Fri, 19 Jul 2024 00:00:00 +0000: Bangladesh - Level 3: Reconsider Travel - travel.state.gov: Travel Advisories

    Updated to reflect/due to Civil Unrest

    Reconsider travel to Bangladesh due to civil unrest, crime, and terrorism. 

    Reconsider travel to:

    • Chittagong Hill Tracts Region due to occasional communal violence, crime, terrorism, kidnapping, and other security risks.

    Country Summary:  Travelers should reconsider travel due to civil unrest in Dhaka. Ongoing demonstrations and violent clashes have been reported throughout the city of Dhaka, its neighboring areas, and throughout Bangladesh. Telecommunications have been interrupted in Dhaka and across the country. Due to the security situation, there may be a delay in provision of routine consular services.

    Travelers should be aware of petty crimes such as pickpocketing in crowded areas. Crimes such as muggings, burglaries, assaults, and illegal drug trafficking constitute the majority of criminal activity in Bangladesh’s major cities, but there are no indications foreigners are being targeted because of their nationality. These crimes tend to be situational, based on time and location.

    Terrorist attacks can happen with little or no warning, with terrorists targeting public areas such as tourist locations, transportation hubs, markets/shopping malls, restaurants, places of worship, school campuses, and government facilities.

    Because of security concerns U.S. Embassy personnel in Bangladesh are subject to some movement and travel restrictions. The U.S. government may have limited ability to provide emergency services to U.S. citizens in Bangladesh due to these travel restrictions, a lack of infrastructure, and limited host government emergency response resources.

    Read the country information page for additional information on travel to Bangladesh.

    If you decide to travel to Bangladesh:

    • Avoid demonstrations and political gatherings.
    • Monitor local media for breaking events and be prepared to adjust plans.
    • Do not physically resist any robbery attempt. Get to a safe area and report any criminal incident to local authorities.
    • Enroll in the Smart Traveler Enrollment Program (STEP) to receive alerts including updates on consular services and so it is easier to locate you in an emergency.
    • Follow the State Department on Facebook or Twitter.
    • Review the Country Security Report for Bangladesh.
    • Visit the CDC page for the latest Travel Health Information related to your travel.
    • Prepare a contingency plan for emergency situations. Please review the Traveler’s Checklist.

    Chittagong Hill Tracts Region

    Reconsider travel to the Khagrachari, Rangamati, and Bandarban Hill Tracts districts (collectively known as the Chittagong Hill Tracts) due to occasional communal violence, crime, terrorism, kidnapping, and other security risks. Kidnappings have occurred in the region, including those motivated by domestic or familial disputes, and those targeting members of religious minorities. Separatist organizations and political violence also pose additional threats to visitors to the region, and there have been recent instances of IED explosions and active shooting. Prior approval from the Government of Bangladesh’s Ministry of Home Affairs Office of Public Safety is required if you plan to travel to these areas.

    Please visit our website for information on Travel to High-Risk Areas.

  • Fri, 19 Jul 2024 00:00:00 +0000: Luxembourg - Level 1: Exercise Normal Precautions - travel.state.gov: Travel Advisories

    Last Update: Reissued after periodic review with minor edits.

    Exercise normal precautions when traveling to Luxembourg.

    Read the country information page for additional information on travel to Luxembourg.

    If you decide to travel to Luxembourg:

  • Mon, 15 Jul 2024 00:00:00 +0000: Iran - Level 4: Do Not Travel - travel.state.gov: Travel Advisories

    Updated to add the Terrorism Risk Indicator and risk of surrogacy tourism.

    Do not travel to Iran due to the risk of terrorism, civil unrest, kidnapping and the arbitrary arrest of U.S. citizens. Exercise increased caution due to wrongful detentions.  

    Country Summary: U.S. citizens should not travel to Iran for any reason. U.S. citizens visiting or residing in Iran have been kidnapped, arrested, and detained on spurious charges.

    Iranian authorities continue to unjustly detain and imprison U.S. nationals, particularly dual national U.S.-Iranian nationals--including students, journalists, business travelers, and academics--on charges including espionage and posing a threat to national security. Iranian authorities routinely delay consular access to detained U.S. nationals and consistently deny consular access to dual U.S.-Iranian nationals.

    Violent extremist groups, including U.S. government-designated terrorist organizations, operate in Iran. ISIS and affiliated groups have claimed responsibility for bombings and other attacks in Iran. The threat of terrorist activity persists, as does the risk of death or injury to bystanders.

    The U.S. government does not have diplomatic or consular relations with the Islamic Republic of Iran. The U.S. government is unable to provide routine or emergency consular services to U.S. citizens in Iran.

    Companies offering surrogacy services in Iran are misrepresenting the security situation in Iran and the risks of the unregulated surrogacy tourism industry. Private companies that arrange such visits and services put U.S. citizens in danger.  

    Due to the risks of operating civilian aircraft within or in the vicinity of Iran, the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) has issued a Notice to Air Missions (NOTAM) and/or a Special Federal Aviation Regulation (SFAR). For more information U.S. citizens should consult the Federal Aviation Administration’s Prohibitions, Restrictions and Notices.

    Read the country information page for additional information on travel to Iran.

    If you are currently in Iran:   

    • Consider the risks involved in possessing dual U.S. Iranian nationality.
    • Review your personal security plan and visit our website for Travel to High-Risk Areas.
    • Draft a will and designate appropriate insurance beneficiaries and/or power of attorney.
    • Discuss a plan with loved ones regarding care/custody of children, pets, property, belongings, non-liquid assets (collections, artwork, etc.), funeral wishes, etc.
    • Establish your own personal security plan in coordination with your employer or host organization or consider consulting with a professional security organization.
    • Leave DNA samples with your medical provider.
    • Have a plan for departing Iran that does not rely on U.S. government assistance.
    • Enroll in the Smart Traveler Enrollment Program (STEP) to receive Alerts and make it easier to locate you in an emergency.
    • Follow the Department of State on Facebook and Twitter/X.
    • Visit the CDC page for the latest Travel Health Information related to your travel.
    • Prepare a contingency plan for emergency situations. Review the Traveler’s Checklist.
  • Thu, 11 Jul 2024 00:00:00 +0000: Maldives - Level 2: Exercise Increased Caution - travel.state.gov: Travel Advisories

    Reissued after periodic review with minor edits.

    Exercise increased caution in Maldives due to terrorism.

    Country Summary: Terrorist groups may conduct attacks with little or no warning, targeting tourist locations, transportation hubs, markets/shopping malls, and local government facilities. Attacks may occur on remote islands which could lengthen the response time of authorities.  

    Read the country information page for additional information on travel to Maldives.

    If you decide to travel to Maldives:

  • Wed, 10 Jul 2024 00:00:00 +0000: Syria - Level 4: Do Not Travel - travel.state.gov: Travel Advisories

    Updated to reflect the risk of wrongful detention

    Do not travel to Syria due to the risk of terrorism, civil unrest, kidnapping or hostage taking, and armed conflict. Exercise increased caution due to the risk of wrongful detention.

    Country Summary: The U.S. Embassy in Damascus suspended its operations in February 2012. Czechia serves as the protecting power for the United States in Syria. The U.S. government is unable to provide any routine or emergency consular services to U.S. citizens in Syria.

    Syria has experienced active armed conflict since 2011. No part of Syria is safe from violence. Hostage taking by armed groups, wrongful detentions, the use of chemical warfare, shelling, and aerial bombardment of civilian centers pose significant risk of death or serious injury. The destruction of infrastructure, housing, medical facilities, schools, and power and water utilities has also increased hardships inside the country.

    The U.S. government strongly warns private U.S. citizens against traveling to Syria to engage in armed conflict. The U.S. government does not support this activity. U.S. citizens who undertake such activity face extreme personal risks, including hostage taking by armed groups, wrongful detentions, injury, or death. Our ability to provide consular assistance to individuals who are injured or kidnapped, or to the families of individuals who die in the conflict, is extremely limited.

    Protests and demonstrations are quelled by government forces through aggressive tactics and protestors, activists, and political dissenters are routinely detained without access to legal representation or the ability to communicate with friends and family.

    Terrorist groups are active in Syria. Parts of Syria have experienced recent increases in incidents of bombings, IEDs, and assassinations. Fighting on behalf of or providing other forms of support to designated terrorist organizations, including ISIS and al-Qaeda affiliates, can constitute the provision of material support for terrorism or a foreign terrorist organization, which is a crime under U.S. law that can result in penalties including prison time and large fines.

    There is an ongoing risk of hostage taking of U.S. citizens and other foreign nationals throughout the country. U.S. citizens are also targets of abduction and/or wrongful detention by the Syrian government. Those in detention do not have access to fair judicial process or medical attention. Government detention centers are known to be unsanitary facilities where widespread cruel, inhumane, or degrading treatment of detainees has been documented, as well as torture and extrajudicial killings. Minors, persons with physical, sensory, or mental disabilities, and elderly have frequently been victims of unjust detention. The Syrian government has also been implicated in the enforced or involuntary disappearance of more than 100,000 individuals, including medical and humanitarian workers, journalists, human rights activists, political opposition, and additionally those suspected of affiliation with these groups and their family members. Only the Syrian government can issue a valid entry visa to Syria. Failure to obtain a legitimate entry visa directly from the Syrian government could result in detention.

    Due to risks of operating civilian aircraft within or in the vicinity of Syria, the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) has issued a Notice to Air Missions (NOTAM) and/or a Special Federal Aviation Regulation (SFAR). For more information, U.S. citizens should consult the Federal Aviation Administration’s Prohibitions, Restrictions and Notices.

    Read the country information page for additional information on travel to Syria.

    If you decide to travel to Syria:

    • Visit our website on Travel to High Risk Areas.
    • Draft a will and designate appropriate insurance beneficiaries and/or power of attorney.
    • Establish a proof of life protocol with your family, so that if you are taken hostage, your family knows specific questions (and answers) to ask the hostage-takers to be sure that you are alive and to rule out a hoax.
    • Leave DNA samples with your medical provider in case it is necessary for your family to access them.
    • Share important documents, login information, and points of contact with family so that they can manage your affairs if you are unable to return as planned to the United States.
    • Develop a communication plan with family and/or your employer or host organization so that they can monitor your safety and location as you travel through high-risk areas. This plan should specify who you would contact first, and how they should share the information.
    • Enroll your trip in the State Department's Smart Traveler Enrollment Program (STEP) to receive Alerts and make it easier to locate you in an emergency.
    • Follow the Department of State on Facebook and Twitter/X.
    • Visit the CDC page for the latest Travel Health Information related to your travel.
    • U.S. citizens who travel abroad should always have a contingency plan for emergency situations. Review the Traveler’s Checklist.